WCCO-AM’s Jordana Green: Why I love Eden Prairie

WCCO-AM’s Jordana Green samples Sub Zero Ice Cream and opens up about why she loves life in the southwest metro.
Jordana Green and her three children, Maddox Comito, 8; Marley Comito, 10; and Ruby Comito, 6, selects treats at Sub Zero in Chanhassen.
When New Jersey native Jordana Green landed in Minnesota in 2001, she had no idea how long she’d be staying. But after having three children and settling into a comfortable life in Eden Prairie, she’s in no hurry to move.
Green came here to pursue her career in broadcast journalism, landing a gig on Fox 29, which became UPN. After UPN closed in 2006, Green had job offers that would have required moving, but instead she opted to stay home with her two children because she wanted another child, and was happy living here.
But by 2011, after freelancing and developing two reality shows that never got picked up by networks, she was ready to go back to work full time when she took on the vice president of programming position at Paul Douglas’s WeatherNation TV. Then in 2012, she began working on her own radio show from 9–11 p.m. weeknights at WCCO-AM.
            Green balances hosting the Jordana Green Show with family life, raising three children, Marley, 10; Maddox, 8; and Ruby, 6; often doing the show from the office of her Eden Prairie home. “[The kids] have learned to be quiet,” Green says half-jokingly, adding that if there’s an emergency, then they wave at her through a glass door and she can help them problem-solve during commercial breaks.
In both her work and home life, she seeks honesty and authenticity. “We’re trying to get better and be a better version of the person we were yesterday,” she says of the inspiration behind her show. And it’s clear that no matter what hat she’s wearing—mom or journalist—she’s always looking for a good story. When we took Green and her children to Chanhassen’s Sub Zero, a casual conversation with the shop owner, Gwen Michael, sparked the idea for a potential show on food allergies.
As family life has had its ups and downs (Green divorced in 2011) and her career has taken twists and turns, Green says she’s always felt supported by the Eden Prairie community.
 
 
SUBHEAD/SIDE
Green and her three children are always up for exploring the southwest metro, so we asked them to help us sample the treats at Chanhassen’s Sub Zero, owned by Gwen Michael. We picked Sub Zero because the shop offers several types of ice cream and frozen yogurt, including a dairy-free version for Green, who is lactose intolerant.
Each of Sub Zero’s ice cream treats is made to order and frozen on the spot, allowing for a huge variety of flavor combinations. Customers can pick their base (premium ice cream, low-fat ice cream, custard, non-fat yogurt or lactose/dairy-free) add a flavor (like chocolate, mint, coffee, cinnamon or one of about 50 options) and select mix-ins (from a variety of candy, cookies, fruit and other classic ice cream toppings). In addition to its Chanhassen location, Sub Zero also offers event catering.
The shop opened last October, and survived a polar vortex, proving that, yes, Minnesotans will eat ice cream in any weather if it’s this delicious.
Here’s what Green’s family thought of the experience:
Jordana ordered Peanut Butter Bonds—a mix of peanut butter, fudge, Reese’s and Brownies—with the lactose/dairy free base: “It tasted like ice cream. It was creamy, delicious and satisfying. The ordering experience was really fun… It’s like a science experiment.”
Ruby ordered the Birthday Cake Capacitor, a mix of cake batter ice cream with fudge, cookie dough and sprinkles: “I think it was really good. It’s a sweet mix of chocolate and vanilla.”
Maddox also chose the Birthday Cake Capacitor: “I think it was really good.”
Marley ordered cake batter frozen yogurt with M&M’s, sprinkles and cookie bits: “It was really good, but really filling.”

When New Jersey native Jordana Green landed in Minnesota in 2001, she had no idea how long she’d be staying. But after having three children and settling into a comfortable life in Eden Prairie, she’s in no hurry to move.

Green came here to pursue her career in broadcast journalism, landing a gig on Fox 29, which became UPN. After UPN closed in 2006, Green had job offers that would have required moving, but instead she opted to stay home with her two children because she wanted another child, and was happy living here.

But by 2011, after freelancing and developing two reality shows that never got picked up by networks, she was ready to go back to work full time when she took on the vice president of programming position at Paul Douglas’s WeatherNation TV. Then in 2012, she began working on her own radio show from 9–11 p.m. weeknights at WCCO-AM.

Green balances hosting the Jordana Green Show with family life, raising three children, Marley, 10; Maddox, 8; and Ruby, 6; often doing the show from the office of her Eden Prairie home. “[The kids] have learned to be quiet,” Green says half-jokingly, adding that if there’s an emergency, then they wave at her through a glass door and she can help them problem-solve during commercial breaks.

In both her work and home life, she seeks honesty and authenticity. “We’re trying to get better and be a better version of the person we were yesterday,” she says of the inspiration behind her show. And it’s clear that no matter what hat she’s wearing—mom or journalist—she’s always looking for a good story. When we took Green and her children to Chanhassen’s Sub Zero, a casual conversation with the shop owner, Gwen Michael, sparked the idea for a potential show on food allergies.
As family life has had its ups and downs (Green divorced in 2011) and her career has taken twists and turns, Green says she’s always felt supported by the Eden Prairie community.
 

Chilly Treats

Green and her three children are always up for exploring the southwest metro, so we asked them to help us sample the treats at Chanhassen’s Sub Zero, owned by Gwen Michael. We picked Sub Zero because the shop offers several types of ice cream and frozen yogurt, including a dairy-free version for Green, who is lactose intolerant.

Each of Sub Zero’s ice cream treats is made to order and frozen on the spot, allowing for a huge variety of flavor combinations. Customers can pick their base (premium ice cream, low-fat ice cream, custard, non-fat yogurt or lactose/dairy-free) add a flavor (like chocolate, mint, coffee, cinnamon or one of about 50 options) and select mix-ins (from a variety of candy, cookies, fruit and other classic ice cream toppings). In addition to its Chanhassen location, Sub Zero also offers event catering.

The shop opened last October, and survived a polar vortex, proving that, yes, Minnesotans will eat ice cream in any weather if it’s this delicious.
Here’s what Green’s family thought of the experience:

Jordana ordered Peanut Butter Bonds—a mix of peanut butter, fudge, Reese’s and Brownies—with the lactose/dairy free base: “It tasted like ice cream. It was creamy, delicious and satisfying. The ordering experience was really fun… It’s like a science experiment.”

Ruby ordered the Birthday Cake Capacitor, a mix of cake batter ice cream with fudge, cookie dough and sprinkles: “I think it was really good. It’s a sweet mix of chocolate and vanilla.”

Maddox also chose the Birthday Cake Capacitor: “I think it was really good.”

Marley ordered cake batter frozen yogurt with M&M’s, sprinkles and cookie bits: “It was really good, but really filling.”